204. Flamborough to Hornsea

I was checking my walking stats for the first 3 months of 2017 with 2018. In 2017 I did 5 walking days compared to 10 in 2018 (and still with a week to go till month end). This is not bad given the appalling weather we have had this Winter. Certainly, having the option of walking down the East coast has meant my overall progress around the coast has not stalled.

My present position on the east coast has now brought me into range for a single day’s walking (albeit a long day). I therefore took the opportunity of a fine forecast for the East Riding of Yorkshire. However, the travel logistics of getting from Hornsea (where I had parked for free) to Flamborough North Landing meant a number of bus and train journeys. I could have got a direct bus to Bridlington, but this meant starting the walk at 11:18, some 2 hours later than catching the bus to Beverley, then train to Bridlington then bus to North Landing. At a whopping £16.10 it was not a cheap option or even a speedy one with travel time + waiting time almost 3 hours!

I get off the bus near North Landing and make my way back onto the Headland Way. It was quite muddy close to the car park, but as I moved further away the going got dryer and far less muddy. It was a lovely spring like morning with the sun out and stiff breeze making sure I don’t get too warm. I headed out towards Flamborough Head, with its famous lighthouses. The old lighthouse was completed in 1674 and is one of the oldest surviving complete lighthouse in England. Built from chalk, it was never lit. I passed the souvenir shops at Flamborough Head and there were a few people out enjoying the morning sun. As I rounded the Head,  Bridlington came into view  and the flat coastline beyond which runs south well into the distance. A footpath runs along the Chalk cliff top which gently dips down to the west such that by Bridlington it is no more.

Flamborough North Landing
Selwick Cove, the sea stack has a tyre placed on its top with a bird nesting in it!!
The Old Lighthouse Flamborough Head
Flamborough Head, can you spot a pair of bird watchers?

By the time I reached Danes Dyke I decided to continue along the beach, walking along the Chalk bedrock. I made good progress along the beach and by the time I reached the outskirts of Bridlington I could see the sea front was quite busy. I passed by a number of the familiar seaside businesses and popped into a nearby Greggs for  a coffee and a sandwich.

I continued along the promenade above South Beach. The next 12 -14 miles was spent on the beach, probably the longest section of beach walking I had done to date. The tide was quite a fair bit out, but I could sense that it was beginning to flow. The underfoot walking conditions was quite good, but I had to seek the firm damp sand every so often. The downside of walking along the beach, is the lack of things to see; you are just basically walking in a very straight line. The upside is given the right underfoot conditions you can make good progress. By the time I was approaching Hornsea, the tide was definitely coming in, but this was not an issue and there were many places to scramble up the slumped cliffs if I needed to. I looked back at my route and could just about make out Bridlington and the chalk cliffs in the sunny afternoon haze.

Flamborough South Landing
Heading towards Bridlington along the beach
Chalk cliffs gently dipping to the west
Bridlington Harbour
There was an awful lot of this type of walking
Entering the sedate resort of Hornsea

Distance today = 23 miles
Total distance = 3,649 miles

 

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