236. Ingoldmells to Friskney Eaudyke

I had decided that I needed to try out my injured knee on a shortish walk on the east coast, before returning to Scotland. So, I set off for Lincolnshire on a very drizzly wet morning but with the forecast set to improve throughout the day.

This particular section of coast is a bit of a pain, as there is the  Steeping River to cross near to Gibraltar Point. There is a nearby bridge over the sluice, but Anglian Water make sure that it is well protected by high fences and barbed wire. To make matters, all of the roads inland are private and they don’t want you walking along them. The only alternative was to follow the busy A52 from Skegness to Wainfleet All Saints and rejoin the sea wall to the south  east. Many coastal walkers have crossed the private roads only to return to the A52. However, there is good news in that there are proposals, now in the latter stages that the sluice bridge be opened up to public access in 2019 as part of the development of the England Coast Path. I opted to drive to the end of one of the many named Sea Lane’s and walk back to the main road to catch a bus. Unfortunately, upon driving out there I passed a large MOD control tower and was confronted with a barrier (open) but a large sign saying this was The Wainfleet Bombing Range! I returned to the main road and parked in a lay-by. As I waited at the bus stop I spoke to a lady about the bombing range, she said it was no longer used as a range and that the control tower was let out as a holiday home!

I caught the #57 bus to Skegness and then the #3 on to Ingoldmells. The drizzle had stopped as I continued south along the sea front. Eventually, the promenade ran out and I walked out on the sand. I found a good walking line on parts of the sand, before the prom at Skegness appeared. I did not intend waking out to Gibraltar Point only to retrace my steps back to Skegness, so I headed out along the A52. I did not plan walking the whole of the section along the A52, as after 2 miles the footpath disappeared and I would be left walking on a small verge alongside a very busy road. So where the footpath stopped I turned down a minor road and then almost immediately down a green lane which crossed fields to the small village of Croft. I continued along minor roads before taking another footpath which sent me through a caravan park. I reached the outskirts of Wainfleet All Saints and crossed the reason for this detour, the Steeping River. Here, the River was controlled with a sluice and is actually pumped out into Wainfleet Haven.

Heading south from Ingoldmells
Skegness Pier
“Skegness is so bracing” as the poster adverts used to say
Heading across fields to the village of Croft
Rescue donkey at a farm near Croft
Croft village hall and church

I entered the quiet village of Wainfleet and headed towards The Batemans Brewery. Bateman’s have been brewing there since 1874 and still remain an independent brewery. I have enjoyed a number of their brews over the years. I called in at the Visitor Centre and had a look around. It’s a very picturesque Brewery with a number of well-preserved and interesting buildings. You can even camp in the grounds!

The sun finally came out of the clouds and it  became quite hot. Back on the A52 I had intended to walk out to the sea wall , then a couple of miles along it before walking a couple of miles back to the A52. This would have meant repeating a two-mile bit on my next section. I looked at the verge on the A52.  My car was just two miles down the road. I opted for a bit of verge walking. Although the road was still busy, the verge was quite wide on either side and the grass not too long. The knee held up well and I now feel confident about returning to Scotland.

Wainfleet Haven/Steeping River
Main square Wainfleet All Saints
The Artefacts Room at the Batemans Brewery Visitor Centre
Batemans Brewery, Wainfleet All Saints

Distance today =  14 miles
Total distance =  4,279 miles

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.