244. Hunstanton to Dersingham

Well this trip turned out to be a disaster in more ways than one! I had awoke about 04:00 and had planned to drive to Kings Lynn and catch the bus to Hunstanton and then walk back to Kings Lynn. Unfortunately I wasn’t feeling very well, my stomach felt upset and I was also feeling quite tired. I should have just gone back to bed there and then. Instead I drove on, knowing that I was not feeling 100%, hoping that I could just “walk it off”.

I caught the 07:23 bus to Hunstanton, which dropped me off at the bus station. At that time of a Sunday morning the town was almost deserted. I made by way down to the promenade and headed south, still not feeling that good. It was a very grey overcast morning, but with reasonable visibility and I could may out part of the shoreline down to the head of The Wash. I walked past the small town of Heacham and continued onto Shepherds Port. I passed a dead seal on the beach before Shepherds Port, but I did not investigate, as it had turned black afer being exposed to the sun.

The section south of Shepard’s Port I knew from previous reports was difficult. Previous walkers had faced confrontation from beach hut owners and some ‘officials[?]’. I had planned a route which I thought would be able to get me inland to bypass this area of no public access. I had read a sign back in Shepherds Port with  a map indicating public rights way in the immediate area. The map was probably the worst map I had ever seen, upside down and with a multi-coloured sections cross-hatched (God help you if you were colour-blind) denoting variety of restrictions. I did see a sign for Dersingham, which I was planning to head for. However, on getting the end of the first lagoon, signs disappeared and there appeared to be an additional lake not on my map. I headed for the sea bank, but was confronted with signs telling me that this was not a public Right of way. I spoke to a local who advised that getting to Decoy Wood (where I knew a public footpath was) would not be easy and would involve some trespassing. I pondered what to do, I could see a lagoon disappearing to the south with no visible means to cross over. It gradually dawned on me that I would have to get to the road that ran to Shepherds Port from A149. This new route would involve quite an additional mileage to my journey, plus I would need to walk along the A149. Most of the land around Shepherds Port is owned by the King Lynn Angling Association who look to be constructing more lakes for fishing close by.

I reached the A149 and donned my hi-vis vest. There was a reasonable verge to walk along, as the constant procession of cars in either direction passed me at break-neck speed. After an additional two hours I arrived at the point on the A149 where I would have emerged from, if my original route was available to me. I’d had enough of the A149 by this point and headed into Dersingham, passing the long closed Dersingham railway station. As I walked through the small housing estate; fatigue, not feeling so good and the effects of the large detour began to have their toll and  I doubted I would be able to complete the walk. I found a seat by a bus stop close to the co-op and decided to call it a day. Fortunately, there is a regular bus service, even on a sunday and I had only had a 10 minute wait until the next bus.

These things happen and although disappointed I live to fight another day!

The Green at Hunstanton
There’s certainly a message here!
Looking back to the North Cliff and the banded Red Chalk and Ferriby Chalk formations
Heading south along the sea wall at Hunstanton
Heading along the beach south of Heacham
New fishing lakes at Sheperds point

 

The old railways station at Dersingham

Distance today = 12 miles
Total distance = 4,419 mile

 

 

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