306. Findochty to Lossiemouth

Today’s walk should have been a straight forward affair of simply walking along the coast, not so!

I had opted to walk this route in reverse because of the availability of buses, meaning I would be able to gain an hour of daylight by walking east to west. It also meant getting up very early and driving back to Lossiemouth then parking up. I caught the 6:38 #33C bus into Elgin and then the 07:00 #35 bus to Findochty. It cost £7.40 for the latter journey, probably the most expensive bus fare I have paid on my coastal walk. I knew that the bus fares in this neck of the woods would be expensive and I did look to buying a weekly Mega-Rider ticket. The total cost of the 6 bus journeys, I made on this trip, came to £26; a Mega-rider may have saved me money> I did look into this and found I would have been travelling through 5 or 6 zones and the online information did not cover the complexity of doing this. Anyhow, £26 is much cheaper than just a single taxi fare and the Stagecoach service availability in this area was excellent….so no complaints from me.

I got off the bus in Findochty and walked through the small fishing village. It was just getting light, but I could see my way around ok. In the far distance I could make out the twinkling lights of Lossiemouth. I crossed over a golf course and soon entered the outskirts of Buckie, passing the smaller settlements of Portressie, Ianstown and Gordonsburgh. Buckie is quite a large town and its port is still used to land fish and repair boats. The whole town is quite strung out along the coast, being composed of a number of smaller individual settlements. I passed through Buckpool and headed towards Portgordon close to the line of the old dismantled Highland Railway line.

I now left the small towns behind and set off towards the mouth of the River Spey at Spey Bay. The River Spey is one of great rivers of Scotland, being the ninth longest river in the UK, as well as the third longest and fastest-flowing river in Scotland and is still important for salmon fishing and whisky production. Today it was in full spate and difficult to see its main channel. I was able to cross the river via the old Garmouth railway bridge. The local golf club in Garmouth has borne the brunt of the Spey in flood having parts of its course washed away in the past. I walked through the small village of Garmouth and noticed a Polling Station – a reminder that today was the General Election (I had already voted by post).

Early morning at Findochty with the lights of Lossiemouth in the far distance
Cluny Harbour at Buckie
The old Highland railway line heading towards Portgordon
The rather drab harbour at Portgordon
The mouth of the River Spey at Spey Bay
The old Garmouth Railway viaduct across The Spey
Crossing The River Spey
Garmouth village
Polling station in Garmouth
Looking back towards Buckie with The Bin of Cullen visible
Oh bug^*r!
Looking towards Lossiemouth

I headed back the short distance to the coast and through the small village of Kingston. Here my coastal walk ended as I was confronted with a large sign that said that the footbridge at Lossiemouth was closed and to use Arthur’s Bridge on the B9103. This bridge was off my printed maps and I did not know if I could get there by walking along the coast. It was very frustrating not being able to make decision which would be the easiest, safest and best route to get me to Lossiemouth. I could see the houses of Lossiemouth some 7 miles away, meaning that I could walk all the way along the coast almost into Lossiemouth and then be thwarted by a bridge from the sand bar over the River Lossie into Lossiemouth itself. I asked a few people on the beach where Arthurs Bridge was, nobody really knew, so I was on my own. This had been the second time on this trip that I had experienced a missing segment of my printed map. My phone is a ‘bog-standard’ voice and text and I vowed that I would look at getting either a GPS with OS 1:50/1:25k or upgrade to a smart phone with an OS app. [I have since upgraded my phone with the OS subscription to use as a back-up to printed maps.]

I headed in land and knew the direction I needed to travel to get towards Lossiemouth. After 3 miles of road walking I picked up a signpost to Lossiemouth indicating the town was still 7 miles away. By coming this route I would have walked an additional 4 miles. I checked my watch, it was a bright day and I knew i would have enough hours of daylight to complete the walk. I eventually arrived at Arthurs Bridge, which was the first bridging point over the River Lossie. Not long after I came back on grid with my printed maps. The B9103 was quite busy, but had a reasonable verge for most parts.

I then had one of the most bizarre encounters of my whole coast walk and the first instance of ‘Road Rage’! As I was walking along a wide 2m grass verge, on the left hand side of the road, a white car stopped next to me sounding its horn and a woman wound her window down and said that I should be walking on the right-hand side of the road. She had obviously not noticed that there was no verge at all on the right-hand side! I blurted out that she should read the Highway Code, but to be quite honest, the guidance contained within it, is poor for pedestrians walking along roads with no pavement. Before I could get my next sentence out this mad woman drove off. What she also did not understand is that if I was walking on the right hand side, I would have been walking on the road itself and any vehicle approaching me would have had to slow down or stop if traffic was coming the other way. The whole encounter was over in seconds, but it really annoyed me. I could not believe that someone had sounded their horn for no reason other than to alert me to their intended rant, stop their vehicle in the carriageway creating an obstruction and then driving off. I had decided to call her Mad Lady of Lossie.

Soon afterwards I entered a forest path and I came upon a sign giving information about the Moray Coast Trail diversion. I could see that I could have easily walked along the coast and then cut inland towards Arthur’s Bridge. Soon after passing the cemetery I was able to follow a footpath all the way into Lossiemouth. I emerged close to the bridge that was closed and the cause for all the extra miles I had walked. I could see Heras fencing on either side of the bridge, the bridge looked complete and ok but obviously there must have been a valid reason for its closure. However, if i was starting my walk here I would have been sorely tempted to climb around the fencing and continue my walk along the coast.

Crossing The River Lossie at Arthurs Bridge
The closed bridge at East Lossiemouth

NB: I also publish all my Scottish Blog entries on the excellent Scottish Hills website, I use the same narrative, but larger photos and a few extra ones. They can be found here:

http://www.scottishhills.com/html/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=24783

 

Distance today =23 miles
Total distance = 5,589 miles

 

 

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